Category Archives: Street Photography

Oaxaca at the beginning of November.

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Here in Mexico the Day of the Dead celebration is one of the most important throughout the year in all the country. At the city of Oaxaca and its surroundings the “Comparsas” and “Muerteadas”, a sort of parades with people dancing and playing music are full of action, enjoyment and peculiar characters where Catrinas stand out celebrate the duality between life and death, and where homage is paid to the ones that have preceded us in the journey to the other side.

Here I share some images I captured in Oaxaca and the town of Villa Etla the first two days of November hauling around my Fujifilm XT10 and my old and a lot larger Nikon D200 DSLR to evaluate the pros and cons of each camera in the task of documenting the area and the celebrations, kind of street and travel photography style. In following posts I’ll be glad to share more images from these days in Oaxaca.

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Aquí en México la celebración del Día de Muertos es una de las mas importantes del año en todo el país. En la ciudad de Oaxaca y sus alrededores las Comparsas y Muerteadas, suerte de procesiones donde la gente canta y baila están llenas de acción, disfrute y personajes peculiares donde destacan las Catrinas celebran la dualidad entre la vida y la muerte, y donde se rinde homenaje a aquellos que nos precedieron en el viaje al otro lado.

Aquí les comparto algunas de las imágenes que capté en Oaxaca y Villa Etla los primeros d0s días de noviembre trayendo de acá para allá mi Fujifilm XT10 y mi vieja y mucho mas grande DSLR D200 de Nikon para evaluar los pros y contras de cada cámara en la tarea de documentar la zona y sus celebraciones algo mas al estilo de la fotografía de calle y de viajes. En publicaciones subsecuentes tendré el gusto de compartir mas imágenes de éstos días en Oaxaca.

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Early morning light giving life to the architecture of the city of Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. ©Eduardo Mendoza.

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Day of the dead celebrations in the streets of Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. ©Eduardo Mendoza.

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Day of the dead celebrations in the streets of Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. ©Eduardo Mendoza.

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Characters at the Muerteadas, Day of the dead celebrations. Villa Etla, Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. Eduardo Mendoza.

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Characters at the Muerteadas, Day of the dead celebrations. Villa Etla, Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. Eduardo Mendoza.

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Characters at the Muerteadas, Day of the dead celebrations. Villa Etla, Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. Eduardo Mendoza.

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Characters at the Muerteadas, Day of the dead celebrations. Villa Etla, Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. Eduardo Mendoza.

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Characters at the Muerteadas, Day of the dead celebrations. Villa Etla, Oaxaca, Mexico. November 2016. Eduardo Mendoza.

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Grasshoppers are some of the insects harvested from the fields of Mexico to serve as food, here, sold at the market of Oaxaca. November 2016. ©Eduardo Mendoza.

Pan de Yema, Oaxaca.

A special kind of bread is made for the Day of the Dead celebrations at the beggining of November in Oaxaca, Mexico, called “pan de yema” or yolk bread, made all year, but decorated with the tiny faces and shaped like people is only made for this ocassion. Market of Oaxaca. November 2016. ©Eduardo Mendoza.

Pan de Yema, Oaxaca.

A special kind of bread is made for the Day of the Dead celebrations at the beggining of November in Oaxaca, Mexico, called “pan de yema” or yolk bread, made all year, but decorated with the tiny faces and shaped like people is only made for this ocassion. Market of Oaxaca. November 2016. ©Eduardo Mendoza.

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Surprise

Note: Sometimes computers, bits and bytes don’t get work well together, last night I finished this post and hit the publish button on the visual editor, this following morning I just found out it was not published, my apologies for this interruption of my month of posting every day, anyway here it is, thanks!!

 

If there is something special and distinctive about the Fujifilm X100 series since it was introduced to the photography world, besides its gorgeous retro looks is that it’s a camera really well suited for street photography. It became evident when a lot of photographers began publishing their experiences using it on the streets, and the loads of images flooded on Flickr, Instagram and other social outlets where scenes of everyday urban life, peculiar moments or interesting people were portrayed in colour or B&W.

All of this street photo “boom” awoke in me the itch about experimenting more the streets with a camera, I had previously photographed on the streets but mostly around special events, parades, festivals or even a manifestation against some social issues. This was done first with a Nikon DSLR and later with my Nikon 1 mirrorless camera, which of course made it a lot easier, carrying less weight and being more inconspicuous.

When I got my X100S, I started making photos of several different subjects, but taking it to the street just for the sake of capturing it in camera did not come so soon, perhaps because I hadn’t got the hang of it to react as quickly as I wanted, and also because I didn’t feel comfortable enough to deal with pointing the lens at strangers, which still happens to me sometimes by the way. Finally I did make some images more in the way I liked with more or less success, sometimes capturing something interesting.

Having reviewed my early work with the X100S I believe this is my first “true” street photo, no so well technically or compositionally executed, but I hope it has something peculiar or interesting about it.

Surprise

Una entrada con encanto. An entrance with charm.

Old entrance

Vagabundear por las calles del Centro Histórico de México siempre es interesante. Debido a que muchas de las construcciones fueron edificadas hace mucho, incluso siglos, los largos años que han pasado a través de las paredes, el piso, la piedra, el aire mismo, son evidentes a la vista. Justo al salir de uno de los restaurantes de la calle de Regina apenas había caminado unos metros hacia Isabel la Católica cuando esta entrada llamó mi atención así que me detuve a echar un vistazo. La luz y las texturas de paredes y techos, el piso húmedo y el silencio, contrastando con la bulliciosa calle afuera apenas detrás mío, realmente causaron una sensación especial, lo que me hizo sacar la  cámara, la Fujifilm X100S, e intentar captar ése sentimiento en una imagen.

Wandering the streets of Mexico City’s downtown is always interesting. Because many of the buildings were built so long ago, even centuries, the long years that have passed through the walls, the floor, the stone, the very air, are evident to the eyes. Right at the time I was leaving one of the restaurants on Regina street I had just walked a few meters towards Isabel la Catolica street when this entrance called my attention so I stopped by to take a look. The light and textures on walls and ceilings, the wet floor and the silence, contrasting with the noisy street outside just behind of me, really gave a special feeling, which made me take out my camera, the Fujifilm X100S, and tried to capture that feeling in an image.